Richard Honigman, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Chair of Research and Education Team
Richard Honigman, M.D., F.A.A.P.

Dr. Richard Honigman F.A.A.P. is a general pediatrician with 30 years of private practice experience. His medical interests include neurodevelopmental disorders, healthcare administration, patient advocacy and pediatric hematology. He has served as a speaker for the Nassau Pediatric Society (NY) and participated in office-based clinical research. He attended NYU's Metropolitan Leadership Program and obtained his M.D. at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine in 1976. Recently, Dr. Honigman also graduated from the University of Massachusetts (Boston) Infant-Parent Mental Health Post-Graduate Certificate Program in 2013.

Moira Hennessey
PhD, MPH, Psychosocial Consultant
Moira Hennessey

Moira is a Psychologist and Public Health professional. Over the past 12 years, Moira has worked as a psychotherapist in New York, Boston and East Africa, focusing on trauma survivors and children and families. Her research interests include cross-cultural mental health, consequences of adversity, and resilience processes. Dr. Hennessey has consulted for numerous international organizations in humanitarian contexts throughout the world, providing assessment, training and program development in areas of child and adult mental health, community and gender-based violence, and public health. Throughout her work, she employs a strength-based approach to supporting individuals and communities. Dr. Hennessey holds a PhD in clinical psychology from Boston University, and a MPH in global health and humanitarian studies from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Sharon Lickerman
Child Development Consultant
Sharon Lickerman

Sharon has been a Montessori educator sine 2000 and has guided children as well as their parents through development by providing education and support. She is currently Head of School at the Ressurection Episcopal Day School in New York City.  Having recived a B.A. in psychology from the University of Texas in Austin and an M.A. in special education from NYU, she brings rich experience in child development from a social, emotional and intellectual perspective. Sharon has experience in different non-profit organizations whose shared purpose is to enrich and improve children's lives. She is a trained yoga instructor for both children and adults and is deeply dedicated to the growth, development and wellbeing of children.

T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.
Research and Education Advisor
T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.

Dr. Brazelton graduated in 1943 from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City and accepted a medical internship there. In 1945 he moved to Boston to serve his medical residency at Massachusetts General Hospital before undertaking pediatric training at Children's Hospital. His interest in child development led to training in child psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and the James Jackson Putnam Children's Center. He subsequently served as a Fellow with Professor Jerome Bruner at the Center for Cognitive Studies at Harvard University. There, the process of integrating his dual interests -- primary care pediatrics and child psychiatry -- culminated in 1972 when he established the Child Development Unit, a pediatric training and research center, at Children's Hospital.

Dr. Brazelton was president of the Society for Research in Child Development for the 1987-1989 term, and the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs from 1988-1991. In recent years, his growing concern about the pressures and stresses that families face in the 1990s and beyond has led to his frequent appearances before Congressional committees in support of parental and medical leave bills; he has worked to improve child care support for all working parents. In 1989, he was appointed to the National Commission on Children by the U.S. Congress, where he advocated with vigor for disadvantaged children.

 

Joshua D. Sparrow, M.D.
Research and Education Advisor
Joshua D. Sparrow, M.D.

Joshua Sparrow, MD, DFAACAP, is director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center in the Division of Developmental Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, where he also holds an appointment in the Department of Psychiatry. He is a co-principal investigator for the National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement (Office of Head Start, Office of Child Care, ACF, HHS), and is part-time associate professor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. In 2010 he was appointed to the Health and Human Services Secretary’s Head Start Research and Evaluation Committee. He serves on the American Pediatric Association’s Child Poverty Task Force, and on the American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) Head Start Collaborative Advisory Council.

At the Brazelton Touchpoints Center, his work has focused on cultural adaptations of family support programs, organizational professional development, cross-sector collaboration, and aligning systems of care with community strengths and priorities. For the past 15 years, he has been deeply involved in shared learning and problem-solving projects that he has termed “collaborative consultations,” for example with the Harlem Children’s Zone and other place-based initiatives, and with American Indian/Alaskan Native Early Head Start/Head Start Programs, among many other organizations and communities around the country and internationally. He is also collaborating with the Center for the Study of Social Policy on an ambitious project to transform public and policymaker understanding of evidence, and to increase its relevance to the ever more complex challenges of raising children to their full potential across diverse contexts.

Edward Tronick, Ph.D
Research and Education Advisor
Edward Tronick, Ph.D

Ed Tronick is a developmental and clinical psychologist. Professor Tronick is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, is director of the Child Development Unit, a research associate in Newborn Medicine, a lecturer at Harvard Medical School, an associate professor at both the Graduate School of Education and the School of Public Health at Harvard. He is a member of the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, a past member of the Boston Process of Change Group and a Founder and faculty member of the Touchpoints program. With Kristie Brandt, Dorothy Richardson, Marilyn Davillier he has created an Infant-Parent Mental Health Post Graduate Certificate Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He has developed the Newborn Behavioral Assessment Scale and the Touchpoints Project with T.B. Brazelton. He developed the Still-face paradigm. With Barry Lester he developed the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Assessment Scale. He is currently working on developing norms for the neurobehavior of clinically health newborns and collaborating with Rosario Montirosso in Milan on a multi-NICU examination of developmental caretaking and its effects on preterm infants. 

Hazel Da Breo, Ph.D
Research and Education Advisor
Hazel Da Breo, Ph.D

Hazel Da Breo is a Psychotherapist and Child Protection Specialist, who specializes in treatments for both victims and perpetrators of Child Sexual Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence. She is Founder and Director of the Sweet Water Foundation which is headquartered in Toronto and has a sister branch in Grenada. She is a contributing author to the first scholastic text on Child Sexual Abuse in the Caribbean Understanding Child Sexual Abuse: Perspectives from the Caribbean, (2013) A.D. Jones ed., and will co-author two further texts in the series (to be published 2014 and 2015, Palgrave McMillan).  Along with running a private practice, Hazel works as consultant to various UN agencies and returns frequently to Toronto where she lectures, maintains a private practice, and attends to her on-going professional development. She served on the Board of the Canadian Association for Psychodynamic Therapy, 2006-2007.

Richard Hunter, Ph.D
Research and Education Advisor
Richard Hunter, Ph.D

Richard Hunter is fundamentally interested in how stressful or traumatic life events alter not only the course of our lives but the very structure and function of our brains as well. Why do many, if not most, humans and animals recover quickly from trauma and why do others go on to suffer life long impairments like depression and post traumatic stress disorder? Why does environmental stress cause some to age more rapidly than others?

To answer these questions, Hunter utilizes a number of rodent models of stress and analyzes the impact of these stress models both on behavior and upon molecular and cellular changes in the nervous system. In particular he is interested in the changes in epigenetic marks and molecules occurring in stress sensitive brain regions like the hippocampus. He has recently shown that one of these marks, Histone H3 lysine 9 trimethyl, a repressive mark, is involved in a genomic stabilizing response within the hippocampus that is targeted at transposable elements within the genome. These elements, which comprise an order of magnitude larger portion of the genome than the genes themselves, are an almost completely unexplored territory with regard to brain function in health or in disease. However, they hold the promise of new understanding of the way the brain adapts, or fails to adapt, to stressful environments.

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